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The UKSG Annual Conference and Exhibition 2021 will be for the first time be held online. The event is a major event in the scholarly communications calendar which attracts a large number of delegates each year from around the world - librarians, publishers, content providers, consultants and intermediaries. The conference combines high-quality plenary presentations, lightning talks and breakout sessions with virtual social events and a major online trade exhibition.

When

April 12 2021 - 09:00
to
April 14 2021 - 14:00

Where

Online
United Kingdom

About the Event

UKSG_Conference Logo 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delegate Registration

Delegate registration will be opening shortly - Register your interest here to join the mailing list

Sponsorship & Advertising

For information about sponsoring the conference, please see the details here.

Exhibition

The Exhibition is now open for bookings - please see here for details! https://www.uksg.org/event/uksgconference2021/SPEX2021

Social Media

For the latest update don't forget to follow us on twitter @UKSG, our event hashtag is #UKSG2021/

Accessibility

UKSG wants to provide the best possible experience for all our delegates, making presentations as accessible and inclusive as possible. We strongly encourage our speakers to provide auto-generated closed-captioning for both live and recorded events as well as making sure the slides as easy as possible for all people to read. In addition we can provide auto generated transcripts post-event for each of the recorded sessions.

If you have particular accessibility needs or questions about this event, please contact events@uksg.org

Delegate Information:

More details on the event platform technical requirements 

Note: All presentations will be recorded and available to watch on demand to registrants. 

Key Sponsors

Our thanks to these Key Sponsors for their additional support for UKSG and the conference this year:

 

 

 

acs logo link 2021

 

IEEE logo 2020
MA Group Logo 2021 b
https://pubs.acs.org/ www.ieee.org/IEEE www.ma-group.ch

 

OUP Logo 2021
rsc logo 2020
www.global.oup.com /academic/online www.rsc.org/ 

 

Programme

Time
Programme and Speakers
Programme
Speakers

09:00

Breakout Sessions: Group A

More details on individual speakers can found the under Breakout Session Group A tab. 

11:15

Opening of the conference

Andrew Barker
Lancaster University

Andrew Barker has been Director of Library Services at Lancaster University since September 2019. Prior to that he was Associate Director of Library Services at Liverpool John Moores University between 2016 and 2019. Andrew has also held senior library roles at the University of Liverpool and the University of East Anglia. 

 

Professionally, Andrew has a longstanding commitment to USKG, of which he is currently Chair. He was previously chair of the UKSG journal Insights editorial board. 

11:30

Lighting Sessions: Group A

Lightning Talks - Group A: 

  • Advancing open data: implementing an Open and FAIR data sharing policy  - Matt Cannon, Taylor & Francis
  • Castles, airports and indexes: impact beyond impact factor - Ben Ramster, ICE Publishing
  •  more to follow...…...
Matt Cannon
Taylor & Francis

Matt is the Head of Open Research for Taylor & Francis. Building on over 10 years’ experience in the editorial department, Matt focuses on setting open science policies and putting them into practice for our journals to increase the transparency and reproducibility of research.

Ben Ramster
ICE Publishing

Ben Ramster is Journals Manager at ICE Publishing, of society and UK charity the Institution of Civil Engineers. He has >15 years of experience working in journals editorial teams, first at Elsevier (life science) and then for a medical communications agency working with the pharmaceutical industry. He has seen ICE Publishing grow from 13 peer-reviewed titles to today's 35, and has organised seminars for ALPSP on both Author Care and Open Access.

12:00

Exhibition opens

Take the opportunity to visit our online interactive exhibition, speak to direct to our exhibitors.  

12:00

Breakout Sessions Live Q&A: Group A (part one)

Join our breakout speakers for a live question and answer session

14:00

Plenary Session 1

Presentations by: 

  •  Colette Fagan, The University of Manchester
  • Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Mellins-Cohen Consulting
  • Ian Moss, STM

 

Chair: Lorraine Estelle

15:10

Plenary Session 1: Live Q&A

Lorraine Estelle will host a live Q&A session with plenary speakers:

  •  Colette Fagan, The University of Mancheter
  •  Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Mellins-Cohen Consulting
  •  Ian Moss, STM

15:30

Lighting Sessions: Group B

Further details to follow...….

16:00

Exhibition

Take the opportunity to visit our online interactive exhibition, speak to direct to our exhibitors.  

16:00

Breakout Sessions Live Q&A: Group A (part two)

Join our breakout speakers for a live question and answer session

17:00

Social Activity: Quiz night

Time
Programme and Speakers
Programme
Speakers

09:00

All Group A Speakers will be available on demand from 9am on 12th April.  Please see below for more details of individual presentations and topics.  

(Do note: a live question and answer session will be available with breakout speakers between 12:00 - 14:00 or 16:00 - 17:00 on the UKSG Stand in the expo - individual timings will be available shortly)

09:00

Session 1:

 

  • A model approach - Salford's frameworks for assessing transformative read and publish deals  - Wendy Taylor & Helen Monagle, University of Salford 
  • Evaluation and Collaboration: Moving to a new decision-making approach in the transitional deals landscape - Sarah Roughley Barake & Kathryn Halfpenny, University of Liverpool 
  • Working with transformative agreements at the Bibsam Consortia  - Anders Granström, The Bibsam Consortium
Wendy Taylor
University of Salford

Wendy has been Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of Salford since 2019 and has held previous roles in cataloguing and repositories. As part of her role in the Library's Research Support Team, she provides training and advice on open access, research dissemination and open research to PGRs and academic staff of all disciplines. She also manages applications to the University's institutional and UKRI open access funds and transformative agreements.

Helen Monagle
University of Salford

Helen is the Electronic Resources Manager at the University of Salford, Her interests include facilitating access to e-resources, usage statistics and development opportunities for new professionals. She is one of the co-founders of NLPN (https://nlpn.wordpress.com/), a network for new and aspiring library professionals.

 

Sarah Roughley-Barake
University of Liverpool

Sarah Roughley Barake has worked as the University of Liverpool's Scholarly Communications Librarian for three years, coordinating all aspects of the library's support for Open Access. This includes management of the University's services for Open Access, providing publishing and dissemination guidance, financial management of all Open Access funding, and assuring strategic direction on Open Access.

Kathryn Halfpenny
University of Liverpool
Anders Granström
The Bibsam Consortium

09:00

Breakout 2: Who speaks for the University on open access?

Publication by publication, university libraries are pivotal to making open access (OA) happen. They are hubs of expertise within their institutions, managing repositories and gold OA funds and offering untiring advocacy and training. However, libraries are service providers. Their researcher clients may not be as immersed in the web of OA options and policy and tools, but librarians have to serve their scholarly communications enterprise, not vice versa. OA cannot flourish as a crusade just of libraries.

This paper uses UKRI’s 2020 policy consultation as a lens to examine the relationship between library and research communities in a Russell Group university choosing between future OA trajectories. The choice to take a researcher-led approach revealed the current reality of OA in the institution. Few academic authors can avoid OA altogether now, but many still limit their attention to overcoming local obstacles to publishing specific outputs. How to distil legitimate and coherent feedback when researcher voices diverge, or manifest surface-level or one-sided engagement with a tangle of intricate challenges? What agency should opinions of library staff exert in this process? Should our institution lead or follow, and who decides?

Tony Simmonds
University of Nottingham

Tony Simmonds is a Senior Research Librarian at the University of Nottingham, where he specialises in open access, copyright and legal information management. He previously worked at the College (now University) of Law and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Breakout 3:

Breakout 3A:  Learning from eTextbooks: looking back and thinking forwards - David Clover

The COVID19 pandemic accelerated the move of many aspects of library provision online across the UK (and elsewhere). Libraries already offered a high proportion of resources in digital formats and both took advantage of free access to ebooks, as well as investing in increased digital content through a variety of packages and solutions. In this session I will reflect on large scale eTextbook provision (based on my experience at two institutions which have run this type of scheme) with consideration to issues of integration within learning and teaching, analytics, changing models of pricing and provision and emerging issues.

 

Breakout 3B:  Etextbooks: coordinating a university-wide approach with no additional budget - Phil Jones

A case study is presented of efforts to coordinate a university-wide approach to etextbooks including library guidance for academics, a tool for keeping track of etextbooks in use across the university and some examples of best practise. These include working with procurement, academic support unit managers and other key stakeholders to ensure that a joined-up approach is taken, etextbook value for money is properly assessed and alternatives to etextbook provision are given due consideration.

 

 

David Clover
Middlesex University
Phil Jones
University of Worcester

A qualified librarian and Fellow of the Higher Education Academy I was recently delighted to complete an MBA (leadership in HE) with distinction.
I have experience of working in multiple roles in public libraries before making the move to HE libraries as a Liaison Librarian at the University of Worcester and then Coventry University. Subsequently I became Academic Liaison Manager at Coventry before moving back to Worcester during the first lockdown.
My career is driven by a desire to connect people with information and help them achieve their potential.

09:00

Breakout 4: Represent: Building diverse library collections in collaboration with library users

In 2019 the University of Leicester library developed a new leisure reading collection. It was important to collection was representative of the incredible range of diverse voices of students, staff and the local population. In order to include more works by underrepresented voices, the library launched the ‘Represent’ campaign and asked users to recommend titles from underrepresented voices for the library to purchase and add to their collections. The ‘Represent’ campaign has since developed to work with student volunteers to look at diversity within subject reading lists as well as creating opportunities to discuss issues around representation more broadly. 
Heena Karavadra
University of Leicester

Heena began her career in public libraries, working as a library assistant for three years with Leicester City libraries. During this time she worked at HMP Leicester library as well as the central and local library branches. In 2016 Heena was awarded the Sheffield Postgraduate Scholarship to undertake her Master’s degree in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield. Since 2018 Heena has been working as an Academic Librarian at the University of Leicester supporting subjects across the College of Life Sciences and the College of Science and Engineering.

09:00

Breakout 5: Surviving (and thriving) during and after a pandemic

This presentation will reflect on how we managed library services at the University of York during the covid-19 pandemic. It will focus on not just the practical physical reopening, but also how we engaged with our university community, senior stakeholders and continued to ensure our own staff wellbeing was front and centre of how we worked. It will include how we positioned the library to be the beacon at the centre of the University.

Finally, it will consider where we might go next and what opportunities the pandemic gives us to position ourselves for a more positive future.

Michelle Blake
University of York

This presentation will reflect on how we managed library services at the University of York during the covid-19 pandemic. It will focus on not just the practical physical reopening, but also how we engaged with our university community, senior stakeholders and continued to ensure our own staff wellbeing was front and centre of how we worked. It will include how we positioned the library to be the beacon at the centre of the University.

Finally, it will consider where we might go next and what opportunities the pandemic gives us to position ourselves for a more positive future.

Breakout 8: Farewell discovery – hello curation and engagement

Resource discovery has become redundant for some students. Over the last 20 years or so, universities have made considerable investments in library centric discovery services. Nevertheless, for some students, especially undergraduates, discovery has become largely irrelevant. They simply log on to their learning management system to find ready prepared links to the print and electronic resources they need for their course or module. This is typically because the learning system is linked to a library managed reading/resource list solution. Certainly, this is the case in the UK and is becoming more common in the US and elsewhere. Ken's presentation will describe and analyse this important trend towards the better curation of, and engagement with, content.

Ken Chad
Ken Chad Consulting ltd

Ken spent over 20 years in the library software business before setting up his consulting business in 2007. His customers include a wide range of academic, health, research, college, public, corporate and national libraries in the UK and throughout the world. Ken's consulting activities include work on strategy, innovation, user experience and the review of services and library technology infrastructure. He has worked for businesses, academic institutions, local authorities, government and sector bodies such as Jisc. Health Education England/NHS, and SCONUL. Ken has published and presented widely on the strategic impact of technology-driven change, and library technology.

09:00

Breakout 9: Pay now or wait a year: Embargoes as a selective barrier to access

In the absence of funds for 'gold' open access, publishers may allow universities to share the author's accepted manuscript on a 'green' basis, with or without an embargo. The former means the work can be openly accessed typically after a period of 12-24 months. Such time gives publishers opportunity to build revenue, but creates inequalities. Firstly, there is a division between those who can afford a fee or can access a library subscription to benefit from the research and those who cannot; but there is also a divide between universities that have funds to pay publishing charges and less research-intensive institutions that have no such fund.

This case study considers journal articles published by Edge Hill University in 2019. Originally a teacher training college, the University received taught degree-awarding powers its university title in 2006, followed by Research Degree Awarding Powers in 2008. A key finding is that embargoes mean certain kinds of research articles can be 'locked down' for longer. For instance, educational research articles were found to be held back from public access for more than twice the time when compared with health research. This divide is driven by disseminating research through publishers which make extensive use of embargoes.

As a result, the consumers of Edge Hill's education research (e.g. schools, teachers) may need to wait longer to use it. This can potentially affect their ability to use research to innovate, enhance practice, or respond to societal challenges.

Liam Bullingham
Edge Hill University

09:00

Breakout 10: The impact of COVID on the research enterprise: A research study

It is no unknown statement to say that the coronavirus pandemic has and continues to impact many - mentally, physically, emotionally and economically. The research community has not been immune to this crisis. Beyond the impact on research output, the sector has and continues to see the sharp end of what is predicted to be a long term economic and financial change for universities and other higher education establishments. Yet while we continue to think on the ‘what can we do right now to help,’ we also need to reframe that focus to look at ‘how can we help going forward’ with a long term view of the new challenges that the research community will face.

However, beyond a general collective understanding that university budgets are likely to be significantly affected, the impact of reduced budgets on the research enterprise is not as easily seen. Drawing on findings from research commissioned by Springer Nature and conducted by Roger Schonfeld from Ithaka S+R, Rob Johnson from Research Consulting and Jason Owen-Smith this session will address issues such as:
- Impacts on how research is conducted
- the knock-on implications and uneven impact this could have on researchers
- ability to attract the funding for critical research programs.
- And how the landscape of research disciplines could and may change
Aimed at all across the research enterprise workflow, the goal of this session is to be interactive using an evidence base to discuss appropriate next steps forwards and recommendations for stakeholders within the research enterprise.

Roger Schonfeld
ITAKA
Rob Johnson
Research Consulting

Rob Johnson is the founder and director of Research Consulting, a mission-driven business which works to improve the effectiveness and impact of research and scholarly communication. Rob began his career as a consultant with KPMG, the international professional services firm, and spent four years as Head of Research Operations at the University of Nottingham, UK. He has led more than 100 projects in the field of scholarly communication, serving universities, funders, publishers, vendors and software suppliers. Rob is the lead author of the 2018 STM Report and a regular commentator on the development of open access and its impact on academic publishing.

 

Susie Winter
Springer Nature

Susie Winter is Director of Communications and Engagement, Research at Springer Nature where she heads up external communications for Springer Nature in its position as a leading research publisher. 

Susie joined Springer Nature from the Publishers Association, the trade association for the publishing industry in the UK where, as Director of Policy and Communications, she was responsible for developing and leading the PA’s work across the policy agenda as well as promoting the UK publishing industry at both a UK and European level.  

Prior to that she was the first Director General for the Alliance for Intellectual Property, working to ensure that the importance of IP rights to the UK economy is recognised.  Having begun her career as a Press and Broadcasting Officer for the Liberal Democrats she then spent several years at communications consultancy Luther Pendragon.

Jason Owen-Smith
Institute for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS)

09:00

Breakout 11: Accessibility: moving the (stuck) dial

We will present a cross industry perspective on the current state of digital accessibility, and why it is vital for commercial goals and inclusivity objectives alike. Publishers need to move beyond a view of accessibility compliance as "nice to have," to a place where it is an industry standard cornerstone of all content creation and platform development. Conformance with basic web accessibility standards can no longer be a secondary consideration, as governments are acting to ensure that directives are transposed into national law. We have seen this with the UN SDG 4, The Americans with Disabilities Act and EU Web Accessibility Directive. Luckily, accessible publishing is not only achievable, but affordable -- with advanced technical systems and formats, such as EPUB. It has never been easier to embed accessibility standards into business-as-usual content products and workflows. This session will explore the current state of content accessibility and what steps publishers and technology providers are taking to fully embrace a truly inclusive and accessible content for all.

Lettie Conrad
Maverick Publishing Specialists

Lettie brings nearly 20 years’ experience in scholarly publishing to her diverse portfolio of product research and development talents and passions. She is dedicated to helping information organizations cultivate a user-centered, standards-compliant approach to digital publishing and academic programs. Her work history demonstrates a commitment to the dissemination of high-quality scholarly and professional publications that advance science and knowledge for the greater good, and transforming the researcher experience.

Lettie excels in driving optimum content discovery and access of academic content platforms, leveraging her R&D experience in web analytics, user experience, information architecture, SEO, institutional discovery, metadata standards, and semantics. In her 10 years with SAGE Publishing, Lettie played a key role in establishing product management expertise and user-centered product lifecycles and market research routines. She was instrumental in launching user-centered web and mobile products, driving research and analysis that enabled evidence-based product management to maintain outstanding quality of SAGE platforms.

Currently, Lettie is North American Editor for Learned Publishing and is a ‘chef’ with the SSP’s Scholarly Kitchen blog. Lettie has a master’s degree in Mass Communication from California State University, Northridge, and is currently a candidate for the Information Science PhD Gateway Program from California State University, San Jose, and the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane.

09:00

Session 12: Diamond Journals and platforms: challenges and opportunities for open scholarship

09:00

Session 13: Employee Resource Groups - grassroots approaches to big problems (e.g. driving gender diversity, equity and inclusion)

09:00

Breakout 14: Journal metrics: what they can and can’t tell us.

With the advent of responsible metrics approaches such as DORA, and their endorsement by funders such as cOAlitions S and the Wellcome Trust, there is a significant anti-journal metric backlash. Alternative ways of assessing journals are being proposed, such as TOP Factor and the Quality Open Access Market, but are yet to gain traction. This talk will explore the many ways we can evaluate a journal; whether journal citation metrics are always a bad thing; and how we might move towards a fairer assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of journals.

Elizabeth Gadd
Loughborough University

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Gadd is a scholarly communications specialist working as a Research Policy Manager (Publications) at Loughborough University, UK. She chairs the INORMS Research Evaluation Working Group, the ARMA Research Evaluation SIG and the LIS-Bibliometrics Forum. She founded The Bibliomagician Blog & was the recipient of the 2020 INORMS Award for Excellence in Research Management Leadership.

 

09:00

Session 15: Librarian attitudes to Subscribe to Open (#16)

09:00

Breakout 16: Navigating the Complexities of Open Access: A Case Study from University of Copenhagen

Imposed by the Danish Ministry of Higher Education & Science, 100% of research outputs in Denmark should be publicly available starting from 2025. Like many others, University of Copenhagen (UCPH) is subject to a national OA strategy as well as Plan S becoming a reality. These changes impact millions of researchers, and all institutions, publishers, and funders worldwide have to take action to, on the one hand, drive change towards OA and Open Science, and on the other hand, comply with the increasingly enforced policies.

At UCPH, less than 40% of research outputs are published OA today. In addition, UCPH already spends around 2 M€ per year in APCs ─ a cost that the university cannot afford to increase. The situation is faced with numerous challenges with increasing complexities of different policies from different funders, different research assessment frameworks, different publisher business models as a response, and a great deal of fragmentation due to the lack of collaboration between the stakeholders. UCPH and the Royal Danish Library have therefore partnered with Chronos Hub, a platform and service provider for streamlining publication processes.

In this talk, we’ll share our experiences of solving these challenges from an institutional perspective. How did we bridge the communication between institutions, publishers, and funders, to unburden both administrators and the individual researchers? What are the effects? What have we learned? And what are the remaining challenges?

The presentation will be held jointly by University of Copenhagen and Chronos Hub.

Martin Jagerhorn
ChronosHub

Martin Jagerhorn has about 20 years of experience in business development and investments in tech companies that serve the research domain. As Business Development Advisor at ChronosHub, Martin establishes new collaborations with funders, institutions, publishers, and technology partners. Previously, on the topic of research information management, he has co-founded and/or invested in companies like AVEDAS AG (exited to Thomson Reuters in 2013), Zendy and Morressier, and is involved as an advisor and consultant towards many universities, publishers, national infrastructure initiatives and funders across the world, and over the last few years more specifically on open access and open science.

Time
Programme and Speakers
Programme
Speakers

09:00

Breakout Sessions: Group B

More details on individual speakers can found the under Breakout Session Group B

11:30

Lighting Sessions: Group C

More details to follow 

12:00

Exhibition

12:00

Breakout Sessions Live Q&A: Group B (part one)

Join our breakout speakers for a live question and answer session

14:00

Plenary Session 2

Presentations by: 

  •  Able Packer, SciELO
  •  more to follow........

 

Chair: Colleen Campbell, Max Planck Digital Library

15:15

Plenary Session 2: Live Q&A

Colleen Campbell will host a live Q&A session with plenary speakers:

  •  Able Packer, SciELO
  •  more to follow........

15:30

Lighting Sessions: Group D

More details to follow......

16:00

Exhibition

16:00

Breakout Sessions Live Q&A: Group B (part two)

Join our breakout speakers for a live question and answer session

17:00

Social Activity:

Time
Programme and Speakers
Programme
Speakers

09:00

All Group B Speakers will be available on demand from 9am on 13th April.  Please see below for more details of individual presentations and topics.

(Do note: a live question and answer session will be available with breakout speakers between 12:00 - 14:00 or 16:00 - 17:00 on the UKSG Stand in the expo - individual timings will be available shortly)

09:00

Breakout 17: Transitioning UK research to an open future

How transitional is the Wiley–Jisc Agreement? This talk will explore the role of transitional agreements in facilitating and accelerating a transition to open access for UK research.
Bringing together data from the first year of the Jisc–Wiley read and publish agreement with examples of transitioning journals, making changes to workflows, and publishing infrastructure in moving us towards an open sustainable research environment. This session will explore examples of the current impact and take up, discuss what this looks like in practical terms for stakeholders and review advantages and opportunities as we move to a fully OA world.

Natasha White
Wiley

Natasha has over 20 years of open access marketing and publishing experience. She is a Senior Director at Wiley and currently manages the transitional open access agreements as well as the B2C aka Researcher marketing departments. Before this Natasha headed up Researcher Product Marketing at Wiley where she was responsible for driving open access and researcher product marketing strategy. Working on positioning Wiley as the first choice publisher for authors by making the author experience the best it can be. Helping Wiley and its journals retain our author base, attract new authors and in turn publish more and generate more author-based revenues. Before joining Wiley Natasha ran her own marketing consultancy during 2007-2009. Before that Natasha was Sales and Marketing Director at BioMed Central, the leading open access publisher, for over 6 years. With overall responsibility for global marketing, sales, and customer service, the company went from strength to strength. During her time at BioMed Central Natasha saw the company gain global recognition and reach profitability in a very competitive marketplace. Before joining BioMed Central Natasha worked for Macmillan Publishers in various marketing roles including Marketing Manager for journals and reference products in the Nature portfolio.

Anna Vernon
Jisc

09:00

Breakout 19: A new funding model for open-access monographs: introducing a novel approach to publishing OA books through library membership funding

We outline the work of a university press, with assistance from the COPIM Project (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs), in launching an innovative revenue model to fund open access monographs at a traditional publisher. Building on library journal subscription models like OLH and on Knowledge Unlatched's approach to monograph funding, we present a new, sustainable OA publishing model that gives members exclusive access to a highly-regarded backlist, with the revenue then used to make the frontlist openly accessible. The model can be emulated by other scholarly presses who wish to take advantage of the opportunities that open access publishing affords.

Martin Eve
Birkbeck, University of London

Martin Paul Eve is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. He is a founder and CEO of the Open Library of Humanities and the lead of Work Package 3 of the COPIM project.

09:00

Breakout 20: How to get started with your Accessibility Programme

Where to begin with digital accessibility? It may seem overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. We aim to equip you with the knowledge and tools to assess where you are with accessibility as well as a brief overview of the current legal landscape. We will then go over approaches you can take to improve your organisation’s digital accessibility and resources to build your own skills and education, allowing you to take the demystification of digital accessibility into your own hands.

Lorenzo Milani
SAGE Publishing

Lorenzo Milani joined SAGE Publishing as part of the User Experience Team in 2018. He wears different hats in his role, focusing on digital accessibility, data and analytics, and discovery opportunities across the organisation.
Lorna Notsch is a Senior Analyst in the Publishing Technology Department at SAGE Publishing. She has been working on digital accessibility across a multitude of products at SAGE for seven years, always bringing her expertise and enthusiasm.

Lorna Notsch
SAGE Publishing

09:00

Breakout 21: From creation to consumable knowledge: supporting research workflows in an open infrastructure

09:00

Session 22: Plan M and Everyday Life: The Practical Challenges of Metadata Supply and Use.

With the JISC initiative to standardise metadata supply with Plan M and the potential inclusion of metadata standards and guidance in the upcoming SUPC Framework Agreement, it is clear that there is a drive towards improving the quality of metadata. But what does this mean practically for Libraries? With fewer resources and the changed nature of the workplace following Covid 19, how can libraries maximise the benefits brought about by Plan M and improve their workflows and metadata standards?

Charlene King
Royal Holloway, University of London

With the JISC initiative to standardise metadata supply with Plan M and the potential inclusion of metadata standards and guidance in the upcoming SUPC Framework Agreement, it is clear that there is a drive towards improving the quality of metadata. But what does this mean practically for Libraries? With fewer resources and the changed nature of the workplace following Covid 19, how can libraries maximise the benefits brought about by Plan M and improve their workflows and metadata standards?

09:00

Breakout 23: The accidental publisher: the highs and lows of running an open journals service single-handedly

After a successful pilot using the Open Journals System (OJS) Liverpool John Moores University launched its open journals service, managed by Library Services. From small beginnings the service is growing and expanding into the sphere of academic journals. With the increasing pressure to publish and make work open access what role can a university open journals service play in supporting that goal?

This presentation will share my experience of setting up and managing an open journals service and how this has developed over time. It will talk about the practicalities of running such a service as well as highlight the positives and share lessons learned.

Cath Dishman
Liverpool John Moores University

Cath is the Open Access and Digital Scholarship Librarian at Liverpool John Moores University. She takes the lead for open access advocacy at LJMU and manages the institutional repository. Cath has over 20 years’ experience in libraries in a range of roles from academic services, customer services, user support and most recently research support. Cath is currently working with academic staff and research managers to ensure compliance with the HEFCE open access policy for the next REF.  Feb 19

09:00

Session 24: Empowering universities and researchers: Two practical toolkits for New-University-Presses and Open Access Book Publishing

09:00

Breakout 25: Open Access

Open Access books are becoming an increasingly significant part of the Open Research landscape. Drawing on perspectives from a range of stakeholders, this session explores both the challenges and the opportunities for OA books - including discoverability, data, cataloguing, funding, and more. Delving into the future of Open Access books, we will be offering some ideas and discussion about what the future holds for OA books. And, with a focus on OA scholarly research monographs, this session will cover the (recent) past, present, and future for this exciting, and fast-moving Open Access format.

09:00

Session 26: Next generation OA analytics: A case Study

09:00

Session 27: Smoothing the Path: An Examination of Managing Author Workflow in the OA transition

The move towards a fully OA environment has moved from a theoretical conversation, to one with a deadline that those of us across Europe in particular saw at the beginning of 2021. Being faced with that deadline, the conversations about a sustainable delivery of OA have had to move from those theoretical one’s focuses on challenges, opportunities and areas of development from the macro industry perspective, and now focus on the practical implications and the impact that these changes have and will continue to have on the workflows of those who are implementing the move to OA.

This session will therefore seek to focus on the details and explore what a transformative deal, one route of moving us towards a fully sustainable and engaged OA environment, looks like from the user workflow point of view. It will examine author workflow, with viewpoints from a publishing, librarian and solutions perspective. It will address topics such as author uptake and what can be done to support and increase this, work through case study examples of implementation and sustainable engagement going forward— addressing such questions as “can we standardize transformative publishing deals?”

The goal is to make the panel interactive by asking questions of the audience as well as the panellists; therefore, getting multiple perspectives on a topic. The aim would be for participants to develop a clearer idea of the implications of transitioning to a fully OA environment, explore how to operationalize this, and see example models explored from the perspective of different stakeholder groups.

Veronika Spinka
Springer Nature
Just De Leeuwe
Delft University of Technology

JUST DE LEEUWE graduated in Economic and Social History at the University of Amsterdam followed by a degree in Information Management at Erasmus University in Rotterdam. He worked for a number of years as an information professional. Today he is publishing advisor at the University Library of Delft University of Technology. For researchers he's the principal contact for their concerns on open access publishing. Just is appointed as the Dutch National Open Access Desk in the current OpenAIRE program. He is also a consultant for students, teachers and scientists on copyright issues, scientific integrity and plagiarism. As an historian he continues to publish articles and monographs publishes on urban history.

09:00

Breakout 28: The changing face of primary sources

09:00

Breakout 29:

 

 

  •  Old Worlds, New Worlds', sustainable partnerships for access to digital archival collections ' a Jisc-Wiley collaboration on digitising the history of science 
  •  What a mouthful! Digital Archival Collections; why are they essential to better library provision?

09:00

Breakout 31: Night Words: Obliteration and Social Media’s Ever-Evolving Cost-Benefit Calculus

Ill-advised sharing on social media often harms more than just the sharer. In obliterating the distinction between private and public experience, social media has not only removed barriers that once protected individuals from the consequences of expressing themselves in self-destructive ways, it has also removed barriers that used to protect society from the spread of destructive ideas. But social media also allows for the rapid and extensive dissemination of good and sometimes life-saving information, while providing a platform for individuals to influence family and friends by modelling responsible behaviour.

Here, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ll analyse social media’s always complex and ever-evolving cost-benefit calculus.

Adam Blackwell
ProQuest

Adam has been at ProQuest for 17 years. He now works on the platform team. Occasionally, he gets to draw on his academic background and do things like present at UKSG and, last year, write the scripts for a series of animated films explaining COVID-19 for educators and students.

Before ProQuest, Adam taught literature and creative writing at the University of Utah, where he earned a PhD in English. He also has a BA in social anthropology and linguistics from Cambridge University (Caius).

Adam lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan with his wife and three children.




 

09:00

Session 32: E-books = pricing and supply issues - views from UK and Ireland

Cathal McCauley
Maynooth University

Cathal is University Librarian at Maynooth University (MU), Ireland. He previously worked in a number of roles in University College Dublin (UCD) Library. Prior to joining UCD, he worked for FGS (now Grant Thornton) as Director of Consulting. He is a regular speaker on issues facing libraries including library design, innovation and change management. He is Vice President and Council Member of the Library Association of Ireland, a member, and former Chair, of the Irish Universities Association Librarians’ Group and he is Chair of the Consortium of National and University Libraries in Ireland. In 2016 he led the move of the IReL initiative to MU and is Director of the Irish University Libraries Collaboration Centre. He is a member, and information coordinator, of IFLA’s Library Building and Equipment Section and he represents the IUA at European Universities Association high level group on ‘Big Deals’.

Johanna Anderson
University of Gloucestershire
Time
Programme and Speakers
Programme
Speakers

10:00

Introduction to Day 3

10:05

Exhibitor Sessions

13:50

Round up and Close of Conference

Andrew Barker
Lancaster University

Andrew Barker has been Director of Library Services at Lancaster University since September 2019. Prior to that he was Associate Director of Library Services at Liverpool John Moores University between 2016 and 2019. Andrew has also held senior library roles at the University of Liverpool and the University of East Anglia. 

 

Professionally, Andrew has a longstanding commitment to USKG, of which he is currently Chair. He was previously chair of the UKSG journal Insights editorial board. 

Registration

January 27 2021 - 00:00 - March 01 2021 - 00:00

£ 125.00 + £ 25.00 VAT

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Commercial Non Member Individual Delegate Fee

Contact

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Exhibition queries - Karina Hunt at KHEC - karina@khec.co.uk 

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